Saturday, June 24, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/24/2017

Still Life With Fruit and Vegetables, 1914, Thomas Hart Benton

Daily Thoughts 06/24/2017

I checked the Twitter and Facebook for the library this morning.

On the way to work, I read some of Leading the Unleadable.  A lot of this book is about how to communicate with people and listen to them so they will be motivated to work.  It is also about what is the baseline amount of work you should accept from people.  It starts from a premise that you should expect excellence.

I checked the displays and the gift books this morning.

We are going to have two programs today, a reading by Jennifer Kitses of her book, The Small Hours from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., and a Reading from the Journal Kaleidoscope which is made by the Senior Memoir Class led by Karen Leahy from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Web Bits


MIT Press, Internet Archive Collaborate to Digitize Titles


10 Most Challenged Books of 2016


 

Friday, June 23, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/23/2017

Reading - Julius LeBlanc Stewart
Reading, Julius Leblanc Stewart, 1884

Daily Thoughts 06/23/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I read some more of Capture today on the way to work.  I especially liked the description of Winston Churchill describing depression as the "black dog."

We have been working on the summer reading things.  The summer reading theme today is "Build A Better World".

We spent some time discussing computer things in the morning.

Right now, I am signing up people for the Adult Summer Reading.  We are giving away books for signing up as well as pens.  I am near the rotunda gallery right now.

The book, Leading the Unleadable How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas, and Other Difficult People by Alan Willett came in for me to read. 

We had a good turnout for out start of Adult Summer Reading.

I checked some biographies today.  I also spent some more time discussing technology.

The books for the reading tomorrow, The Small Hours by Jennifer Kitses came in.

Web Bits


KHCPL to be the First Library in the World to Display Work  by Banksy

New York Public Library to Display Declaration of Independence Copy for Holiday Weekend

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/22/2017

Jeanne Reading - Camille Pissarro
Jeanne Reading, Camille Pisarro, 1899

Daily Thoughts 06/22/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

Last night, I attended the Mount Vernon Public Library Board of Trustees meeting.  There was some discussion of written policies as well as the central library status.

Last night I read some more of Capture.  I am reading about what drives people to become killers.  There is a discussion of why Sirhan Sirhan, Ted Kaczynski, and Eric Harris became murderously insane.

I checked the displays and the gift books this morning.  I also did a little more work on programming. I also spent some time working with a new librarian the Literacy program.

Tonight we have an Immigration Forum in the Grace Greene Baker Community Room from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

There is also a Tablets and Smart Phones class from 5;30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

I posted a list of CD Audiobooks to Bookletters.

Web Bits


Syrian Students Library Helps Arabic Culture Blossom In Berlin

The Original Wonder Woman Slays the Crowd at Library of Congress

24,000 Vintage Cartoons from the Library of Congress Illustrate The History of This Modern Art Form (1780-1977)

Library and Archives Canada Launches Its First Enhanced E-book


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/21/2017

Sir William Orpen - Grace reading at Howth Bay.jpg
Grace Reading at Howth Bay, Sir William Orpen, Circa 1900

Daily Thoughts 06/21/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I placed a hold on Leading the Unleadable:  How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas, and Other Difficult People by  Alan Willett.

On the way to work, I read some more of Capture.  David A. Kessler, M.D. describes David Wallaces writing of the novel Infinite Jest.

I also read some more of A Paradise Built in Hell.  The book is very radical in its content.  Rebecca Solnit is describing the anarchist, Kropotkins view on the concept of mutual aid.

I checked the displays and gift books this morning.

I printed up some flyers.  There are some bookmarks being printed up for the Build A Better World Summer Reading program.  We looked through some of the galleys to use as giveaways.

I spent some time going over the procedures in the computer lab.

I created the sign up sheets for the July computer classes.

I checked out two more books, Social Media for Writers Marketing Strategies for Building Your Audience and Selling Books by Tee Morris and Check Wendig and Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards.  One of our librarians is going to teach a drawing class using Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.



Web Bits


Librarians In the 21st Century: We Need to Talk About Library Security

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/20/2017

Velimir Khlebnikov by M. Larionov (1910).jpg

Velimir Khlebnikov by M. Larionov (1910)

Daily Thoughts 06/20/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

On the way to work, I read some more of Capture.  The author uses many examples of famous people with problems as examples: Jim Belushi, Anne Sexton, and Robert Lowell.

I checked the gift books and the displays today.  I also did some weeding.  We are getting a few donated games.

I also did a little more work on ordering.

I spent some time going over Content Reserve for Overdrive Advantage.

We also had the Crochet Group today from 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

There are two computer classes tonight, a Fundamentals of Computers class and a Beginning Microsoft Word 2013 class.

On the way home, I read some more of A Paradise Built In Hell.  I am reading about the idea that disasters bring about social change.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/19/2017

Still Life with Raisin Cake, Fruit and Wine - William Michael Harnett
Still Life With Raisin Cake, Fruit, and Wine, William Michael Harnett, 1876

Daily Thoughts 06/19/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I spent a little time working on programing and flyers for programs.

I also read some more of  Capture. I am reading about how people get drawn into bad habits like drinking heavily, falling for the wrong lover, cutting oneself, and other destructive actions.

I read a little bit more of A Paradise Built in Hell.  I am reading about how William James and Dorothy Day experienced civic engagement during the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

Web Bits


Library Advocacy Efforts Gain Steam

Lynda Carter Presents Wonder Woman Film Script to Library of Congress

Meet Lori Rivas, Library Advocate                   


Sunday, June 18, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/18/2017




Walter Shirlaw, Among Old Poets, 1909

Daily Thoughts 06/18/2017

Happy Fathers Day!

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I read some more of Unf*ck Your Habitat today.  I am reading about how to negotiate cleaning with the people who you live with.  I did a little more cleaning and found my old bag of change in one of my drawers.  I used it to fill up the Sharper Image change jar which I had bought for five dollars which counts how much change is put in it.

I also read some more of Capture. I am reading about William James and Sigmund Freud.

I finished reading Unf*ck Your Habits You're Better Than Your Mess today by Rachel Hoffman.  I found it inspirational.  I even took some of the advice for cleaning.

I looked through the Purchase Alerts tonight.

Web Bits

Popular Authors: Keep the Old Copies?


Comic Book History, Legends at Library of Congress  Exhibit


Saturday, June 17, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/17/2017

Jean BĂ©raud La Lettre.jpg
Jean Beraud, La Lettre, 1907

Daily Thoughts 06/17/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I started reading Capture Unraveling the Mystery of Mental Suffering by David A. Kessler, M.D.  The suicide of David Foster Wallace, the author of Infinite Jest is described.  David Foster Wallace was medicated for depression.

I received an advanced reading copy at home from Hachette Books, Memory's Last Breath, Field Notes on My Dementia by Gerda Saunders.  It is coming out this month, it is a memoir.

I read some more of Unf*ck Your Habitat You're Better Than Your Mess.  I'm finding it motivating, I cleaned out my refrigerator, put away all my laundry away, and wiped down most of the surfaces in my house.  Like many people, I would rather be reading than cleaning.  The book reminds you to clean anything that can smell bad first and start at the top and move to the bottom.  Right now, I am reading about how to clean small spaces like apartments.  During the last week, I also took some time to do some work so that the area around my desk is cleaner.  I had some items added to the collection next to my desk, looked over some materials I had questions about, sent a few boxes back to Humanities New York, and sorted a variety of paperwork.

Web Bits


Chicago Public Library's Youmedia Program Expanding


The Impact of Libraries As Creative Spaces (Australian)


Heroin Tourists Check Out of McPherson Square Library, Courtesy of the Police



Friday, June 16, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/16/2017

Bookman advertisement March 1895.jpg
The Bookman Advertisement, March 1895

Daily Thoughts 06/16/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I finished reading This is What a Librarian Looks Like: A Celebration of Librarians, Communities, and Access to Information by Kyle Cassidy.  This book has lots of pictures of libarians.  Each picture has a brief statement about what they believe is central to libraries.  In addition, there are essays.  My favorite essay is by George R.R. Martin, it is about how librarians curate and preserve science fiction.  This book promotes libraries.  Kyle Cassidy asks the question, "What can you do for libraries?" He also worked with Everylibrary which is a political action committee to make sure copies of this book were sent to all the United States senators.

I checked the gift books and the displays this morning.  I also worked on scheduling for July.

In addition, I spent some time working on programs.


Web Bits


The Library of Congress Wants More People to Get Into Webcomics

Library of Congress Names Tracy K. Smith as New Poet Laureate


Thursday, June 15, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/15/2017

Still Life - Henri Fantin-Latour
Still Life, Henry Fantin-Latour, 1866

Daily Thoughts 06/15/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

On the way to work, I read some more of A Paradise Built In Hell.  I am reading about the 1906 Earthquake in San Francisco.  It gives a different account about how people lived after the earthquake.  Rebecca Solnit describes how soldiers and elites were often more interested in protecting their property then helping everyday people.

I checked the displays and the gift books.  I also looked over some of the books that are not in the system.

I checked out the book, This Is What A Librarian Looks Like by Kyle Cassidy.

I spent some time checking the biographies.

We talked to Literacy Solutions at Yonkers Public Library today.

I am working with a new librarian going over weeding.  We are also discussing the Spanish language films in our collection.

I read some of This Is What A Librarian Looks Like on the way home. It has lots of color photographs of librarians.  The book opens with a short essay on the Library of Alexandria, there is also an essay on The Library Company of Philadelphia.  The book is a tribute to librarianship.  There are several authors who write about why they love libraries including Jeff Vandermeer, Neil Gaiman, Cory Doctorow, and Amy Dickinson.  I am about to start reading the essay by John Scalzi.  The design is superb

Web Bits




The Hidden Treasures In Italian Libraries

10 Things You Don’t Know About Authors On a Book Tour


                                        

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/14/2017

Reader Leaning Her Elbow on the Table - Henri Matisse
Reader Leaning Her Elbow On the Table, Henri Matisse, 1923

Daily Thoughts 06/14/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I have to work on planning for Summer Reading today.  I spent time discussing programming for summer reading.  We are going to start with two book clubs and an end of summer reading party.  I also spent some time working on a visit from St. Paul's Church and the Women's Enterprise Development Center.

I checked the gift books and the displays today.  I also checked some of the biography books and large print.   We added a few new instructional videos.

A lot of new material is coming in to be added to the collection.  Our circulation is slowly growing.

I read some of Beyond Measure The Big Impact of Small Changes by Margaret Heffernan.  It is a TED book.  The book focuses on corporate culture.  It describes how managing conflict positively improves results.  There are also sections on why it is important to not work too many hours, get enough sleep, and avoid multitasking.

The book, A Paradise Built In Hell the Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster by Rebecca Solnit came in for me to read.

I had a chance to clear away some material from my desk.  I can see it clearly and hopefully will get a chance to organize things a little more.

There is an Advanced Excel class tonight from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the computer lab.

I finished reading Beyond Measure The Big Impact of Small Changes by Margaret Heffernan. This book focuses on qualitative changes, not numbers.  It challenges hierarchy, asks people to look outside their organizations to find new ideas, and try to make environments where everyone can contribute.  It is about people and how people interact.  It is an argument for a workplace that values peoples contributions and flattens decision making.  There is no cure all in this book, just a lot of different suggestions.

Web Bits


How To Use Social Media to Attract Users to Libraries Columbus Metropolitan Library Insights

New Comic Book Exhibit Represents Resurgence In Industry

New York Public Library Main Reading Room Officially Enters Designation Process

                                                                                                                                

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/13/2017


Oliver Herford, Crocodile Reading, Circa 1891, Graphite, Brush, and Ink.

Daily Thoughts 06/13/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I read How We'll Live On Mars by Stephen Petranek on the way to work.  It is a short book of 77 pages.  The writing is very concise.  Stephen Petranek writes about Elon Musk and Robert Zubrin two people who have influenced the space race recently.  He also writes about the basic technologies people will need to survive on Mars.  It is a good concise overview of colonizing Mars.

Two more TED books came in for me to read, Why We Work by Barry Schwarz and The Big Impact of Small Changes by Margaret Heffernan.

I checked the displays and the gift books.  I put in a few orders for books.  I also spent a little time with work on bookmarks.

I went through some items that needed to be reentered into the system.  I also set aside some audiobooks to be added as well as some mystery paperbacks.

The Crochet Group met today from 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.  We are requesting some donations of games for games night.

The Fundamentals of Computer class and the Beginning Microsoft Word class are tonight.

I read Why We Work by Barry Schwarz on the way home.  It was a quick read.  Barry Schwartz is a psychologist.  His focus in this book is how to make work both meaningful and productive.  He presents ideas like people who are satisfied with their work have a purpose.  Purpose comes from giving meaning to work.  Barry Schwartz offers some insights like the more things are codified, the less meaningful work is.  He is arguing against scientific management in the sense of making work meaningless by making it simple and repetitive.  He describes a future where work has meaning and value which creates happiness.  This book is short and to the point.  It is 96 pages long.








Web Bits


Library of Congress Japanese Wood Block Prints

Audiobooks and Engagement
                                                                                      

Monday, June 12, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/12/2017


 
Paperweight, Louis Comfort Tiffany, 1902

Daily Thoughts 06/12/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I read some more of Walkaway on the way to work.  I am enjoying the language being used to describe utopian technology in a science fiction setting.  I am reading about people getting brain uploads.

I checked the displays and the gift books this morning.  I also spent some time on scheduling.

I also put in an order for new books.  I finished putting together an order for Adult Summer Reading Prizes and an order for a book, The Small Hours which is going to be read on Saturday, June 24.

I have three new people I am working with, a part-time librarian, a full time electronic resources librarian, and new computer clerk.  I had to a variety of training today.

I spent time in the computer lab, looking over the Spanish books, and discussing our Adult Summer Reading Plans.  I am going to be looking at the bookmarks I made earlier.  I still have all the templates.  We will be a bookmark for the Adult Summer Reading program and the Teen Summer Reading Program.  I also discussed the Hispanic Film Brochure with one of the new hires.

I checked out the book, How We'll Live on Mars by Stephen L. Petranek which is a TED book.

The trains stalled on the way home.  There were signal problems.  I ended up finishing Walkaway because of this.  It came across as very idealistic leftward thinking.  The Walkaways don't win the battles, but they grow anyway.  The story is about a clash between those who have nothing and seek to make a community where there is disaster and the ruling elite.  At the end of the book, there are acknowledgements for three titles which Cory Doctorow read, Debt The First 5000 Years by David Graeber, Capital in the Twenty First Century by Thomas Pikettty, and A Paradise Built in Hell by Rebecca Solnit.  I placed a hold on A Paradise Built In Hell.

This book seems to draw from the recent commentary on the 1%, the Occupy Movement, and protests about inequalities in wealth.  There are also a lot of references to contemporary groups like Anonymous, the Maker Movement and open source manufacturing.

In addition it is easy to spot ideas about transhumanism, abundance, post scarcity, and future systems of economics.  The content is very speculative.  I found it entertaining to read.

Web Bits


Library of Congress making 'good progress' on IT management recommendations

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/11/2017

Charlotte Bosanquet - The Library at Dingestow - Google Art Project.jpg
Charlotte Bosanquet, The Library at Dingestow, created in the 1840s.

Daily Thoughts 06/11/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I started reading Walkaway last night by Cory Doctorow.  It is near future science fiction. The story is about people who build their own communities outside of regular society called "walkaways."  It describes the end point of a variety of technologies like 3D printing, open source manufacturing, emergency construction techniques, recycling, and fab labs.

I read some of Unf*ck Your Habitat You're Better Than Your Mess by Rachel Hoffman.  This is a book about organizing for people who lead imperfect lives.  It suggests doing 20 minutes of cleaning followed by 10 minutes of rest.  It also tackles issues for people who have disabilities like depression or back pain.

Web Bits


Libraries Transform Progress Report

Vintage Photos of Traveling Libraries        

In Oregon, A Struggling County Just Shut Down Its Last Public Library
http://www.vocativ.com/434974/douglas-county-oregon-last-library/


Saturday, June 10, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/10/2017

Reimer Librarian.jpg
George Reimer, Librarian, Created Between 1850 and 1866

Daily Thoughts 06/10/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

On the way to work, I read Asteroid Hunters by Carrie Nugent.  This was originally a TED Talk which was turned into a book.  The book is a quick read of 108 pages.  It tells the story of how people discovered asteroids and how they look for them in the sky.  It also describes why people hunt for asteroids to make sure that none of them hit the earth and create an extinction event.  This made me want to read the other TED books, because it was quick, entertaining and informative. https://www.ted.com/read/ted-books    I want to read How We'll Live On Mars by Stephen Petranek.  I placed this on hold.  I also placed Beyond Measure, The Big Impact of Small Changes by Margaret Heffernan and Why We Work by Barry Schwartz.

I checked the gift books and the displays this morning.  I also spent some time looking at different library policies.

I spent some time working on Bookletters today and posted a few lists of books and DVDs on Facebook.

I subscribed to the I Love Libraries newsletter in my email today.

I checked out the books, Capture Unraveling The Mystery of Mental Suffering by David A. Kessler, M.D.  and Walkaway by Cory Doctorow.


Web Bits


Amazon Will Be The Fifth Largest Bookstore Chain

Friday, June 9, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/09/2017


Married Life - Roger de La Fresnaye
Married Life, Roger de La Fresnaye, 1913

Daily Thoughts 06/09/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I read some of Nat Love who is a famous black cowboy.  The story is so gripping that I missed my train stop.  It is not politically correct.  There are battles between Native Americans and cattlemen as well as gunfights with bandits trying to steal cattle.  Nat Love describes what it was like to be a cowboy on the open range, a master horseman, and dead shot.  He earns the name "Deadwood Dick" by proving he is the best shot with the rifle and pistol in a contest.  He also describes what it is like to rope and throw cattle.  He starts as the son of a slave on a farm living a life of hardship.  Then he wins a raffle for a horse, sells the horse and heads out west.

I checked the displays and the gift books this morning.

I also am looking over items that are not in the system.

I spent some time working on activities for Summer Reading.  We have the sign up page set up.  I also am finalizing the prizes which will be given out as part of the Adult Summer Reading.  We are planning a book to film program where we watch the film and read the book and discuss both.

I also checked the New York Times Bestseller list and the Publishers Weekly Bestseller list.  I am working on an order of books today.

I have a new part-time clerk who is going to be working in the public computer area and the computer lab in the afternoons.  I also have a person who is going to be working with me full time, so I have training to do as well as scheduling.  In addition, I have a part-time librarian who is starting tomorrow on Saturday.

I finished reading The Life and Adventures of Nat Love: Better Known in the Cattle Country as "Deadwood Dick".  I like that the book shows how the country changes.  Nat Love goes from being a cowboy to being a Pullman Porter working on the railroads when he realizes that the railroads are moving west.  The writing shows a change in stride while still keeping the reader interested.  

Web Bits


GLBT Book Month

New Book: "America and the Great War: A Library of Congress Illustrated History"

We have this.  We also bought  The Card Catalog which is another recent publication from the Library of Congress.

Pondering A Country Without Libraries
http://nepr.net/post/pondering-country-without-libraries#stream/0

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Daily Thoughts 06/08/2017

Thomas Jefferson Writing the Declaration of Independence, 1898, Howard Pyle

Daily Thoughts 06/08/2017

I checked the library Twitter and Facebook this morning.

I finished reading Blue Ocean Shift Beyond Competing Proven Steps to Inspire Confidence and Seize New Growth by W. Chan kim and Renee Maugborgne.  The final parts were how to convince people to buy into new strategy by having an all day fair, how to introduce strategy into new markets, and an example of how Blue Ocean Strategy is used on a large scale in government.  There were plenty of new ideas.  I especially liked the idea of how to enter new markets with no competition.

I checked the displays and the gift books today.  This month is LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) books month.  There is a display on the subject.  There is also a display on black music.

I spent some more time working on the Adult Summer Reading Program.  I am arranging to buy prizes for the program; pens, pads, cups, and tote bags..  The theme this year is Build A Better World.

I read a copy of Library Journal.  Right now, I am going through the New York Times Book Review and working on orders.

I spent some time discussing the budget with the treasurer today.

I also printed some flyers.

I checked out the book, Life and Adventures of Nat Love A True History of Slavery Days, Life on the Great Cattle Rangers and on the Plains of the West by Nat Love.


Web Bits


Margaret Atwood: What Would a World Without Public Libraries Be Like?

Review of the FY 2018 Budget Request for the Library of Congress, Architect of the Capitol

The Internet of Things Connectivity Binge What Are the Implications

New York Today: A City Library on the Subway